Understanding Stress

Stress in the World Today

Managing Work-Related Stress
It’s not the job that creates stress, it’s the way a person responds to the urgencies and demands of each workplace environment that makes them stressed or energized.

The Harmful Side of Stress

How to Fight Stress-Related Diseases
No one can avoid all stress -- and a certain amount actually is good for you. But it's always best to keep unhealthy levels in check when possible.
Stress Can Increase Your Risk for Heart Disease
Mental stress does more than diminish your sense of well-being. It also can increase your risk for heart disease.
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
PTSD is a condition that often follows a terrifying physical or emotional event—causing the person who survived the event to have persistent, frightening thoughts and memories of the ordeal.
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
A person with IBS has a colon that is more sensitive and reactive than usual, so it responds strongly to stimuli that would not affect other people.
Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema)
Atopic dermatitis is a hereditary and chronic skin disorder that mostly affects infants and young children, but may last until a child reaches adolescence or adulthood.
Stress Can Pack on Pounds
Many people hunger for sweets, salty snacks, and other processed foods when they are stressed. One solution: Reach for healthy high-fiber snacks with a bit of the tastes you crave.
Insomnia
Insomnia, the term for having trouble sleeping at night, is one of the most common sleep complaints. About one in three adults has bouts of insomnia that last a few days at a time.
Heart Attack
A heart attack occurs when the blood supply is cut off from the heart muscle, usually because of a blood clot. Without blood and oxygen, the muscle cells are damaged and die.